Best comment about Dynasty ever?

Zara

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I saw this excellent comment on a Dynasty-video on YouTube (when Blake gives flowers to Krystle because he deflowered her).

First I thought our Snarky had posted it. It bears Snarky's Dynasty insight and way with words, but then I realized it was far too positive about Dynasty/Blake/Krystle to be written by Snarky ;)

Do you agree with the poster about what made Dynasty so unique and filled with that special atmosphere and remembrance?

(I can also add, in my opinion, the true sentiment between Blake and Krystle was at its best in season 1 and 2, even though Blake was an asshole most of the time. But we learned about the hurricane inside of him facing the existence of Krystle. His three biggest sentences in the I'm-so-sorry-accept-my-flowers scene are perhaps the best three lines of their entire saga and romance. It's warped they came out in a situation like that, but maybe that was what was needed for the words to come out. Blake was the most honest when facing total loss.)


Here it is:
The dialogue between Krystle and Blake was always beautifully and
tenderly written. Even though it was a soap, the sentiments were very
warm and superbly acted between them. Their tv marriage had almost the
quality of lush 1950s soaps like Peyton Place in the treatment of the
screenplay with those drawn and telling silences reminiscent of old
fashioned teleplays like the TV western 'The Big Valley' (1965-1969) in
which Linda Evans got her big career break playing Barbara Stanwyck's
daughter. Evans and Forsythe cut their acting teeth working alongside
some of the most accomplished old studio system actors of the 20th
century and their skill and stagecraft as performers shows in this
scene. The Big Valley genre always had similar long scenes (shot in one
take with one actor in the background and the other in the foreground
without looking at each other for most of the scene) of almost
whisper-quiet dialogue with noticeably absent soundtrack which created a
heightened tension rarely seen today in television scripted dialogue. In
that way, Blake's and krystle's scenes together always had a very
different feel than those with Alexis, where Collins's barging, noisy,
starry and campy kinesthetics mostly degenerated into satire, or
absurdist, kitschy, cartoon-like comedy, and as the series progressed -
blatant hysteria and high-camp. When Alexis threatened and tortured her
enemies, Joan could often become overly shrill ( like Elizabeth Taylor
would) and sometimes a too-campy and draggy screen presence. At other
times when the tension was more subtle it was brilliant. Perhaps it was
these stylistic extremes which appealed to soap audiences whereby the
genre calls for a certain staginess and theatricality which was a
hallmark of Dynasty but hardly new. Dynasty was both very comfortingly
melodramatic and old fashioned like a 1940s George Cukor "woman's film"
in its creation by the Shapiros, and at the same time very racy and
modernist (perhaps more thanks to Aaron Spelling). It was almost like
there were two separate series going on within the one show: the
quasi-1950s dreamy Dynasty of Vaseline-lensed & soapsudded telenovellas
and then the queer postmodern pastiche of the gay 80s "Alexis Show."
Certainly the first and second seasons possessed less of the
Collinsesque camp which she single-wristedly injected into the series.
Having said that, Joan did make that role memorable and in many ways
twisted it into a very postmodern soap with her diamond-cut
characterisation of Alexis Colby-Carrington. But when I look back now, I
can see there were some gorgeous sub-plots within the narrative that
were sublimely written and masterfully produced and conceived by the
Spelling-Shapiro powerhouse. With the end of Dynasty not only was it the
end of the 1980s but really the end of a certain kind of grace, pace and
old world mid-century class as epitomised by John & Linda's measured
acting in this scene. Perhaps sadder still, it was also the end of the
unparalleled style of the 20th century.
 
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Snarky's Ghost

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Yes, it's much too gushy, and doesn't really convey the series' unfortunate change in tone. But his/her comments are nice.
 
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