Bette Davis vs. Joan Crawford

Who do you prefer?

  • Bette Davis

    Votes: 14 50.0%
  • Joan Crawford

    Votes: 3 10.7%
  • Both

    Votes: 9 32.1%
  • Neither

    Votes: 2 7.1%

  • Total voters
    28

Barbara Fan

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re Bette in A piano for Mrs Cimino

I always remember watching this when i was at school, and was impressed that Digger Barnes no 2 was in it
I think I liked it and Im sure I cried (that doesnt take much)

I have looked for it on DVD over the years and see it is now on Youtube


love BF x
 

Barbara Fan

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Jack Warner aka/ played by the wonderful Stanley Tucci on his role

 

Caproni

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Autumn Leaves: Crawford's latter-career outing, released in 1956. It came on TCM some months ago, and I watched it. It was recently re-aired, and I'm re-watching as I type this. Personally, I find the film quite good. Of course, it isn't Crawford's best; nor is it her worst, either. She and Cliff Robertson have good on-screen chemistry together, and the movie overall plays quite well. I did notice, however, that their was considerable effort to "soften" Crawford's look and aid the illusion that she wasn't as old as she was (and, in turn, feeding the ego of Miss Crawford). (She around 52 in 1956, depending on which year of birth you side with that is.) Naturally, this is (arguably) achieved by the black-and-white filming, and shades cast across her neck, which is often covered with turtle necks.

What's your thoughts?

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Caproni

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They have got to release this drama on DVD - please

Yes!!! I am more than ready for a re-watch of this miniseries! I hope it comes to Netflix and soon, too!!!
 

Snarky's Ghost

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Autumn Leaves: Crawford's latter-career outing, released in 1956. It came on TCM some months ago, and I watched it. It was recently re-aired, and I'm re-watching as I type this. Personally, I find the film quite good. Of course, it isn't Crawford's best; nor is it her worst, either. She and Cliff Robertson have good on-screen chemistry together, and the movie overall plays quite well. I did notice, however, that their was considerable effort to "soften" Crawford's look and aid the illusion that she wasn't as old as she was (and, in turn, feeding the ego of Miss Crawford). (She around 52 in 1956, depending on which year of birth you side with that is.) Naturally, this is (arguably) achieved by the black-and-white filming, and shades cast across her neck, which is often covered with turtle necks.

What's your thoughts?

View attachment 10577
Haven't seen AUTUMN LEAVES in eons, but I recall it had a disturbed vibe to it -- but then I don't think I'd seen too many Crawford
movies at the time.

I rather like Crawford's potboilers from the '50s: THE DAMNED DON"T CRY and SUDDEN FEAR (both good movies) and even FEMALE ON THE BEACH and the poorly-directed-by-the-screenwriter yet otherwise perfect Joan Crawford vehicle, QUEEN BEE -- the movie role daughter Christina asserts was the most like the real Joan, and I totally believe it.

 

Alexis

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I just will never understand what Joan did to her face, intentionally and even without surgery. I mean she was a very beautiful woman, and she clearly knew about fashion and an aesthetic. So I cant for the life me understand why she made herself look so hard as she aged. The short hair, the over emphasised brows the overdrawn lips. It made her look very unfeminine somehow. The worst thing about her appearance from the '50s on is that hair. It makes her look combative, aggressive and man-ish. Her hair looked great in the '40s, sort of shoulder length and worn down. She should have embraced that style as her signature look. Her hair up or very short emphasises her strong bone structure, but probably overly so. It's too square, too angular, it's more handsome somehow. It needed softness around it. When I see her with the short hair or hair pinned up I always think drag queen in a wig cap.

 

Snarky's Ghost

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I just will never understand what Joan did to her face, intentionally and even without surgery. I mean she was a very beautiful woman, and she clearly knew about fashion and an aesthetic. So I cant for the life me understand why she made herself look so hard as she aged. The short hair, the over emphasised brows the overdrawn lips. It made her look very unfeminine somehow. The worst thing about her appearance from the '50s on is that hair. It makes her look combative, aggressive and man-ish. Her hair looked great in the '40s, sort of shoulder length and worn down. She should have embraced that style as her signature look. Her hair up or very short emphasises her strong bone structure, but probably overly so. It's too square, too angular, it's more handsome somehow. It needed softness around it. When I see her with the short hair or hair pinned up I always think drag queen in a wig cap.
In the '50s, obviously, short hair really came in for women, especially women of a certain age, and I guess always-fashion-conscious Joan just hopped on board.

Also, she had a face lift in the early-'50s where everything was pulled too tight. She was apparently aware the job was botched, and yet it had the effect of emphasizing that ferocious "Crawford look" we would later come to most associate with her, even though she hated it.

Joan Collins talked about meeting snooty Crawford at a party around that time and described how "hard" and "painted" her fifty-something namesake was, Collins pointing out how Rita Hayworth, also in attendance, was "infinitely more glamorous."

Looks a wee bit like her karmic sister Bette here, doesn't she?:
 

Alexis

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In the '50s, obviously, short hair really came in for women, especially women of a certain age,
I get that but Joan's own particular short look was just so strange. Not all like the other '50s cuts that actresses had. That super short fringe and then those little rolls around the back. Joan's is just bizarre compared to the likes of these. Any of the Elizabeth Taylor styles would have suited her much more I think.
 

ginnyfan

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There seems to be a time in the early/mid 50s when pretty much every actress out there had that awful, extremely short haircut. The likes of Taylor and Janet Leigh could pull it off since they were so young but for older ladies it was usually disastrous.

 

ginnyfan

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Speaking of Joan and Liz, this paragraph of Torch Song trivia makes me wonder how could anyone not love Joan..... :D


Crawford's return to MGM was a source of mixed emotions for the star. Because Lana Turner, Ava Gardner and Kathryn Grayson weren't working at the time, their dressing rooms were combined into a grandiose suite for Crawford, who was notorious for living at the studio while making a film. The day she arrived, a large banner reading "WELCOME BACK, JOAN" hung over the studio's front gate, and a red carpet had been laid from her parking space to the dressing room door. On the first day of shooting, Crawford presented the crew, many of them old friends, with gifts, a ceremony she usually reserved for the last day. But this was very much a new MGM to Crawford. When she toured the lot and met the current crop of young stars -- including Debbie Reynolds, Bobby Van and Anne Francis, she quipped "Lovely children, but where are the stars." :bump:She was particularly dismissive of leading man Michael Wilding's wife, Elizabeth Taylor, referring to her as "Princess Brat." When the younger, more publicity worthy actress insisted on visiting her husband during shooting, Crawford finally left orders that she be barred from the set.:cool1


 
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