How Do You Pronounce "Worry"?

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How do you pronounce the word "worry"?

Until recently it was always pronounced to rhyme with "hurry". Now more and more often I hear it pronounced to rhyme with "sorry" - and it's annoying.

You might argue that it is more consistent this way but since when was consistency a feature of the English language?
 

James from London

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Worry hurry curry Murray flurry for me.
 

WeldonBallou

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One word I've noticed mispronounced by many people is Jewelry. These individuals will say "Jew-lah-ree"....and nobody says nothing about it
 

Alexis

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One word I've noticed mispronounced by many people is Jewelry. These individuals will say "Jew-lah-ree"....and nobody says nothing about it
Yes, you see that one a lot. I don't know why people say it it like that. Clearly it's the word Jewel pronounced as such with -ry at the end. Of course we have the double l, but it's the same thing.
 

James from London

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One word I've noticed mispronounced by many people is Jewelry. These individuals will say "Jew-lah-ree"....and nobody says nothing about it
I guess I say "jool-ree", but I'm not sure. It's not something I say out loud very often. I think I might start saying "joo-ler-ree" though, cos it's funny.

Another thing I don't say out loud very often is "Kerry Katona". One day, I had to say it for work and it kept coming out "Kerry Takona." It's strange - I'd seen and heard the name lots of times over years but had no idea I couldn't pronounce it until that moment.
 

Mel O'Drama

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These individuals will say "Jew-lah-ree"....
I guess I say "jool-ree", but I'm not sure. It's not something I say out loud very often. I think I might start saying "joo-ler-ree" though, cos it's funny.
With the non-Americanised spelling being "jewellery" it possibly clouds things even more.

I generally use your "joool-ree" pronunciation (though I like to say it with three "O"s as it sounds grander"). But sometimes there's a little "uh" sound between the "L" and the "R" which isn't so much as a syllable as a space for my tongue to switch between consonants. And if my diction gets sloppy I hardly pronounce the "L" at all.

I've always liked Charles Hawtrey's affected pronunciation of "jewel", which puts all the emphasis on the second syllable (and sounds like "d'you-WELL"). Now I'm wondering how he would pronounce "jewellery".



Another thing I don't say out loud very often is "Kerry Katona". One day, I had to say it for work and it kept coming out "Kerry Takona."
And did "Kerry" rhyme with "Merry", "Hurry" or "Sorry"?
 

James from London

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Well that seems right to me, it's basically just Jewel-ry isnt it?
Hmm, I think I pronounce "jewel" like "duel", except with a j. So it takes me longer to say "jewel" on its own than when it's the first syllable of "jewellery". But then I also say "Jool in the Crown".
 

Mel O'Drama

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Then we have those who pronounce "Du" as "Ju" as in "Juke of York".
In the UK, there are many words that would traditionally have a "y" sound added. So "Duke" would have been "dyook"; "tune" would be "tyoon"; "Dune" would be "dyoon" and "issue" would be "iss-you".

In recent times - depending on region and age - there's a tendency to blend the opening sounds. So Duke has become "juke"; "tune: is now "choon"; "dune" is "June" and "issue" is more commonly "ish-oo". Perhaps it's a way of getting around that thorny "two consonants together" thing. Or a way of simplifying speech (the added "y" sound in the traditional pronunciations does seem to take more effort).

There's a short-but-interesting piece on it here.
 

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In the UK, there are many words that would traditionally have a "y" sound added. So "Duke" would have been "dyook"; "tune" would be "tyoon"; "Dune" would be "dyoon" and "issue" would be "iss-you".

In recent times - depending on region and age - there's a tendency to blend the opening sounds. So Duke has become "juke"; "tune: is now "choon"; "dune" is "June" and "issue" is more commonly "ish-oo". Perhaps it's a way of getting around that thorny "two consonants together" thing. Or a way of simplifying speech (the added "y" sound in the traditional pronunciations does seem to take more effort).
It's much the same here.

I still say "dyook" but I prefer the American "dook" or "toon" to "juke" or "choon". I do say "ishoo".
 
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James from London

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Then we have those who pronounce "Du" as "Ju" as in "Juke of York".
Hmm, I think I pronounce it both ways, depending on the context.

I'm not sure this is quite the same thing, but I study accents sometimes and I notice that certain pronunciations depend on where the word comes in a sentence or phrase. For instance, a lot of North of England dialects don't fully pronounce the final 'ee' sound in words like money or funny or sunny. Instead, the 'ee' becomes a soft 'e', as in egg: mon-eh, fun-eh, sun-eh. In Nottingham, they do the same thing, but not all the time, so "Tony Hadley from Spandau Ballet" sounds like "Ton-ee 'adl-eh from Spand-ah Ball-eh".
 

Mel O'Drama

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I still say "dyook" but I prefer the American "dook" or "toon" to "juke" or "choon". I do say "ishoo".
One thing about this evolution is that we have a choice of pronunciation, these days.

I'm not in one strict camp regarding the traditional/contemporary pronunciations. It often comes down to sentence structure or the person I'm speaking to. Sometimes I'll hear myself say "ishoo" and think it sounds lazy. Other times I'll say "iss-you" and think it sounds pretentious. I suppose the long and short of it (if my glass is half empty) is that there are now more ways to get it wrong.
 

Emelee

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Worry rhymes with hurry, curry and flurry. In no way will I accept anything else.

With issue, I say ishoo. One of my colleagues say iss-you. To me, it sounds weird. But Brenda Blethyn says it on Vera too.
 
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