Sons & Daughters Watching/rewatching/discussing The Aussie Hit Show

James from London

Telly Talk Superstar
Top Poster Of Month
Messages
4,352
Reaction score
5,238
Location
Brixton
Medals
5
Member Since
Time immemorial
Most episodes in the early 200s are peppered with unpleasant comments from the same few people who seem to be hate watching. They express disappointment in Paul for not being the perfect saviour, or judgemental hatred towards Rob for behaving the way people in soaps do. The comments are a curious juxtaposition of idealist and jaded at the same time. They are - to say the least - a very different interpretation to my own viewing experience.
There's a strange double standard people seem to have when criticising soap characters' behaviour online. They hold the characters to a stricter moral code than one would one's own family and friends, while making no allowances for the fact that said characters are living in a soap opera, the conditions of which would lead most real-life people either onto the top of a building with a shotgun, or into a padded cell in a straitjacket.

His son is attractively cheeky, albeit a bit too immature. I was curious to see what became of him. Good things, it seems...
Yes, I remember that character standing out the last time I watched and I googled his name as well. He's a better actor than he needed to be in S&D, so it was kind of gratifying to know he'd done well afterwards.

I don't think I had any conception of the change between Seasons 1&2 though - is that all made clear on YouTube?
 
Last edited:

Mel O'Drama

Super Moderator
Staff Member
Messages
6,946
Reaction score
9,561
Medals
12
Member Since
28th September 2008
It looked like the custody storyline was going to be that explosive event that would force the characters to take sides (or not, but that would be considered just as disloyal).
Alas, it wasn't meant to be.
Yes - it was a little of a damp squib, but I can't say I'm too sad about it. Custody storylines aren't a favourite of mine as a rule.


Rob decided to show us his skin-coloured speedos.
I'm not sure how I feel about them. He wears them very well, but I don't think much of the colour. They look like those items people wear for supposedly nude scenes. It's like he's wearing tights that have been cut into briefs. Tighty whiteys would look much better. Or black. You can't go wrong with black.


I like all the phrases and expressions that are frequently used e.g. "take the weight off your feet"/"get on like a house on fire", it makes the dialogue so much more colourful.
I'm glad you've pointed this out, because I don't take much notice of them - probably because the Aussies and Brits share many of these expressions - but I'll keep an ear out from now on.


The story began with John Palmer being the subject of circumstances, now he's a mover & shaker who puts the characters in a certain position, or in a particular place at a particular time.
His role as the crusader who wants to decide what's best for everyone is a far cry from the lovely guy having an awkward dinner with the Hamiltons.
I've just watched an episode where [teeny spoiler] he commented to Kevin that neither of them knew what a suit looked like a year ago. It's nice the characters - and by the same token the writers - are acknowledging the change. It still doesn't mean it's a change for the better, but at least it feels like they have their eye on the ball.



I like Gordon's car, I don't think we had seen it before?
Oh, was that Gordon's? I thought it was Barbara's Rolls, which has been seen on and off for as long as she has. She was loading manure or something into it in her very first episode.

If it is Gordon's then I like the idea of them having His and Hers Rolls Royces.



There's a strange double standard people seem to have when criticising soap characters' behaviour online. They seem to hold the characters to a stricter moral code than one would one's own family and friends, while making no allowances for the fact that they are living in a soap opera, the conditions of which would lead most real-life people either onto the top of a building with a shotgun, or into a padded cell in a straitjacket.
Spot on, James.

Are Millennials and Generation Zs more analytical I wonder? Or is it just the kind of pre-internet discussions we had about characters in TV shows gone awry.


I don't think I had any conception of the change between Seasons 1&2 though - is that all made clear on YouTube?
I don't think there's anything on YouTube to distinguish where one ends and the other begins. Just to have it clear in my head I've been using this as a reference (as well as other interesting areas of the website).
 

James from London

Telly Talk Superstar
Top Poster Of Month
Messages
4,352
Reaction score
5,238
Location
Brixton
Medals
5
Member Since
Time immemorial
I like all the phrases and expressions that are frequently used e.g. "take the weight off your feet"/"get on like a house on fire", it makes the dialogue so much more colourful.
And then there's all the AUS slang like G'day/it's a beaut/barb-y (barbecue).
I'm glad you've pointed this out, because I don't take much notice of them - probably because the Aussies and Brits share many of these expressions - but I'll keep an ear out from now on
The one phrase I associate with S&D, and subsequently Australia, is "I'll be in it!"

Are Millennials and Generation Zs more analytical I wonder? Or is it just the kind of pre-internet discussions we had about characters in TV shows gone awry.
Well, my theory is that discussion begets discussion. So people might start off commenting about a programme they've seen as an afterthought, but then after a while, the importance of commenting begins to supersede that of the programme itself. So the programme almost becomes something you watch in order to then post about. So you end up watching thinking, "What is my hot take on this and how will I phrase it?" rather than just experiencing it.

None of which applies to us here on Soapchat of course!

I've been using this as a reference (as well as other interesting areas of the website).
Aha! Thanks! Bookmarked!
 
Last edited:

Willie Oleson

Telly Talk Schemer
Messages
13,895
Reaction score
16,099
Location
Plotville, Shenanigan
Medals
15
Member Since
April 2002
I don't think I had any conception of the change between Seasons 1&2 though
To be honest, neither did I - but since it's been decided that there was a season 1 and 2 I'll just use it as a reference.
And Patricia's unintentional big reveal was a game changer, kind of a retcon, so at least it feels like a new chapter.
I thought it was Barbara's Rolls, which has been seen on and off for as long as she has
Thanks!

I always prick up my ears whenever music is being played in the background, so far I haven't recognized anything.
When Davey (and Lynn and Doug) was staying with Fiona they used a strange xylophone sound, was it supposed to be relaxing music for babies?
 

Willie Oleson

Telly Talk Schemer
Messages
13,895
Reaction score
16,099
Location
Plotville, Shenanigan
Medals
15
Member Since
April 2002
To be honest, neither did I
Also because I just recognized the episode 202 cliffhanger as the one that was shown on Dutch television as the-last-one before the summer/holiday stop.
It's not spectacular or anything, but I remember being very excited about Patricia's threat. Well, it certainly feels like a the-bitch-is-back-moment.

Nevertheless, S&D (like Howards' Way and Who Pays The Ferryman) seems like a typical summer tv-series, and now I wish I had started a few months earlier with my re-watch.
Could have finished it before NuDynasty returns!
 

Mel O'Drama

Super Moderator
Staff Member
Messages
6,946
Reaction score
9,561
Medals
12
Member Since
28th September 2008
The one phrase I associate with S&D, and subsequently Australia, is "I'll be in it!"
That's very Australian. Along the same lines as David Palmer's occasional "she'll be right".


Well, my theory is that discussion begets discussion. So people might start off commenting about a programme they've seen as an afterthought, but then after a while, the importance of commenting begins to supersede that of the programme itself. So the programme almost becomes something you watch in order to then post about. So you end up watching thinking, "What is my hot take on this and how will I phrase it?" rather than just experiencing it.
This is fascinating. So it's a form of expression that stems from a deeply rooted Id-driven psychological desire for approval. This brings a whole new meaning to "couch potato".


None of which applies to us here on Soapchat of course!
:embarrassed:


I always prick up my ears whenever music is being played in the background, so far I haven't recognized anything.
If they're using library music for the score, I can't imagine they're going to fork out much in royalties for ambient music.

I thought I recognised one of the tunes played at Fiona's during a romantic dinner scene at while back, but it was kind of an ersatz instrumental version. Darned if I can remember the song now, but it was something along the lines of The Shadow Of Your Smile.



When Davey (and Lynn and Doug) was staying with Fiona they used a strange xylophone sound, was it supposed to be relaxing music for babies?
It was a subliminal warning that Fiona was going into full on Hand That Rocks The Cradle mode.



I just recognized the episode 202 cliffhanger as the one that was shown on Dutch television as the-last-one before the summer/holiday stop.
I love learning about how shows were aired internationally. It may not be the most exciting cliffhanger, but you did get a great Patricia freeze frame.
 

Mel O'Drama

Super Moderator
Staff Member
Messages
6,946
Reaction score
9,561
Medals
12
Member Since
28th September 2008
#222

I wonder if there's something in Cornelia Frances' contract that states she must be swathed in head bandages once every six months. As I recall this is something that happened several times in various roles of hers. I've also noticed that she's an actress who frequently does "stints" for weeks and months at a time before departing again. She's now left again to go to a convalescent home, which is departure #3 (or is it #4). As always, I'll miss her. She did a wonderful job with her head injury and partial paralysis storyline. But absence makes the heart grow fonder.

Lynn has left (yay) and taken Davey with her (boo). Kevin is furious at her (finally). I'm enjoying the bromance between Kevin and Peter.

Jill and Angela have each acquired a stalker this season. Jill's stalker is Brian, who is Irish... by way of Abu Dhabi, apparently. Although the screen version is rather average, Brian is a character that excites me as I encountered the novelisation of this and several other upcoming storylines before watching it on TV some years later (I missed the first half of the entire series the first time round and didn't see these earlier episodes until UK Gold aired them in the mid-Nineties).

Angela's stalker is even more pedestrian, sadly. I can't remember this storyline at all. It's a teenage kid who is gaslighting her by stealing notes, making noises and whatnot. There is a kind of intensity to the kid, but it's a little off-putting that he looks rather like a young Richard O'Sullivan. We've had a few scenes that are like S&D versions of Halloween, with the camera watching Angela from outside the kitchen window, Angie coming out to investigate a strange noise and calling out to the unseen intruder. That kind of thing. All the same, I wish this storyline would get a move on. Fortunately, it has given Angela time to get serious with Paul while Rob's away (another storyline I read before I watched).

Paul has gone all forces of darkness on us. The news that his Grandfather's money was made with prostitution has driven him over the edge. In addition to making his move on Angela, and a confrontation with Fiona resulting in a bitch slap, he's also throttled Wayne and just had an enjoyably menacing in-person conversation with Patricia:

Paul
You're the most evil woman I've ever met
Pat
I'm not really interested in your opinion. Your attack on Wayne proved how unbalanced you are.
Paul
If you'd been there it would have been you. You're the one who deserves it.
Pat
I'm here now. What are you going to do about it?
Paul
There are other ways to get back at you... You see you have a weakness you haven't counted on. I'll use it. And I'll destroy you.

As if Patricia didn't have enough trouble with Martin Healy. This is getting good.
 

Willie Oleson

Telly Talk Schemer
Messages
13,895
Reaction score
16,099
Location
Plotville, Shenanigan
Medals
15
Member Since
April 2002
That's very Australian. Along the same lines as David Palmer's occasional "she'll be right".
I'm sure that "tick" (as in: second, or otherwise very short period) is not an exclusively Australian expression, but I've never heard it being used in such a consistent way.
Lynn has left (yay)
U not like Lynn? U = my fanemy.
Seriously now, I found it so heartbreaking when Kevin (my precious, of all people) sentenced her to life in the Palmer household as the dutiful wife and mother.
He mellowed a bit in the next episode - soaps are infamous for their fake anticipations - but that cliffhanger scene is one of my favourite moments.
I also loved her secret trips to Patricia for a second opinion, although it never felt like a treacherous thing to do.
Paul has gone all forces of darkness on us
Oh, how intriguing!
I'm still watching his good Samaritan episodes, but it's so funny when Rosie can't resist bringing up the "Gail" debacle, usually followed by an awkward silence.
It almost feels like a MeToo situation, one mistake can overshadow a million good deeds.
Not that I would justify a criminal act, she was underaged - however, it wasn't a problem as long as Gail assumed that he was her boyfriend.

Wow, you really must be watching from dawn till dusk:D
 

Mel O'Drama

Super Moderator
Staff Member
Messages
6,946
Reaction score
9,561
Medals
12
Member Since
28th September 2008
I'm sure that "tick" (as in: second, or otherwise very short period) is not an exclusively Australian expression, but I've never heard it being used in such a consistent way.
It's nice to hear it said with an Australian accent. "Teak".


U not like Lynn? U = my fanemy.
Oh, I really want to, but I just can't find it within myself.


Seriously now, I found it so heartbreaking when Kevin (my precious, of all people) sentenced her to life in the Palmer household as the dutiful wife and mother.
He mellowed a bit in the next episode - soaps are infamous for their fake anticipations - but that cliffhanger scene is one of my favourite moments.
Can't beat a good Kev ticking off.


I also loved her secret trips to Patricia for a second opinion, although it never felt like a treacherous thing to do.
Oh -that's interesting. To me it seemed more treacherous than most of what Patricia or Wayne do, because she was so nice about it.


I'm still watching his good Samaritan episodes, but it's so funny when Rosie can't resist bringing up the "Gail" debacle, usually followed by an awkward silence.
It almost feels like a MeToo situation, one mistake can overshadow a million good deeds.
Yes, that's about the size of it. And the YouTube comments prove that Rose isn't on her own. He's being historically condemned by half the internet.


Wow, you really must be watching from dawn till dusk:D
Well, vice versa with this lovely weather.

Actually, it's been a few in the morning and a few last thing at night. But sometimes those numbers creep up. I may have to slow down in the coming days as the heat is taking it out of me.
 

Willie Oleson

Telly Talk Schemer
Messages
13,895
Reaction score
16,099
Location
Plotville, Shenanigan
Medals
15
Member Since
April 2002
These episodes are really good, lots of drama, dilemmas and arguments.
Lynn has left and taken the baby with her, will the Sons & Daughters saga come full circle?
It's all very exciting!
 

Mel O'Drama

Super Moderator
Staff Member
Messages
6,946
Reaction score
9,561
Medals
12
Member Since
28th September 2008
I may have to slow down in the coming days as the heat is taking it out of me.
Hmm. I didn't factor in that hot nights means it's difficult to sleep. So...



#235


Martin Healy is now the season 2 equivalent of David & Patricia in season 1.
Almost unnoticed at first, the Healys have successfully infiltrated the series, and what a good thing this is proving to be.

Suddenly they're practically the central family, with some of the series' juiciest, most compelling scenes at the moment. They certainly put their fellow Melburnians to shame with their capacity for drama. The most interesting thing to happen to the Palmers lately seems to be David's off-screen battle with the Sun-In (David lost, evidently), while the Healys are as unpredictable as Brian's accent (we seem to be somewhere in West Wales with it around now).

As retcons go, the follow up to Patricia's revelation about the twins' parentage has proved really good for the series. It could have gone horribly wrong, but the careful overlapping of families is striking a balance of sorts in the series; on the one hand we have the sturm und drang of Patricia's plot for revenge against Martin in typical Sydney style. While on the other there's Peter being all down home with the Palmers and Rob and Ange.

But it's the Healys' own brand of dysfunction that's making them compelling. The dynamic between Martin, Peter and Jen is fascinating. They're a family torn apart and hanging on by a thread. Peter has stopped riding round in rickety old cars and has a storyline with some very real, very devastating consequences.

Martin becomes ever more unlikeable with each passing episode, for which I give the writers and Paul Sonkkila due credit. He's great. There have been some incredibly ugly scenes with both his children, but particularly Peter. And there's the promise of more greatness to come.

Meanwhile, poor, confused Jen has become a pawn in Patricia's revenge strategy. And my God - Pat is really twisted about it. Messing with the girl's mind - and body - simply because she knows that it will affect Peter, and give her revenge. Seeing Pat go from ardently pro-life to pro-choice-without-the-choice is as cold as we've seen her so far. Jennifer's feelings and psychological wellbeing are as naught to her. It's all about piling on the pain any way she can, and seeing her speaking about it in such a matter of fact way to Wayne is almost sickening. Jen has unknowingly blown Patricia's potential future blackmail leverage over her, so Pat is going to have to rely on manipulation. It looks like she's got away with it, but I kind of hope not.

Patricia's enemies are legion and she's planning to take them all out. Uneasy alliances are being formed. It's very exciting. Paul may be openly hostile at the moment, but Margaret is the wild card. Taking her to Woombai could prove Patricia's undoing...

But maybe that's just what she wants us to think.
 

Mel O'Drama

Super Moderator
Staff Member
Messages
6,946
Reaction score
9,561
Medals
12
Member Since
28th September 2008
These are great. And they must be from an episode Willie and I have watched recently.

According to the annotations, they were taken on 7th December 1982, so that gives us an idea of how far in advance the episodes were shot.







 

Willie Oleson

Telly Talk Schemer
Messages
13,895
Reaction score
16,099
Location
Plotville, Shenanigan
Medals
15
Member Since
April 2002
Ah yes, that bizarre, pointless window.
It's interesting that most characters (visitors) appear from the right part of the room, but when Patricia answers the door she goes to the part with the staircase.
I had not expected this to be from 1982! I "feel" like I'm already in 1984.
 

Mel O'Drama

Super Moderator
Staff Member
Messages
6,946
Reaction score
9,561
Medals
12
Member Since
28th September 2008
It's interesting that most characters (visitors) appear from the right part of the room, but when Patricia answers the door she goes to the part with the staircase.
Maybe it depends who's calling. Could it be that the door Patricia answers is directly connected to the Palmers' kitchen or hallway?

Seriously, I'm hopeless at noticing this stuff. Patricia would really run rings round me.


I had not expected this to be from 1982! I "feel" like I'm already in 1984.
That's interesting to keep track of. You're kind of in the right direction with it. Although filmed in late' 82, these episodes aired in '83.

I find specific years quite hard to pin down with this show. So many of the characters had the same "look" for much of the run. The clothes are probably on trend but much of it is not the kind of high fashion that screams a specific year. And then there's the decor.
 

Willie Oleson

Telly Talk Schemer
Messages
13,895
Reaction score
16,099
Location
Plotville, Shenanigan
Medals
15
Member Since
April 2002
Almost unnoticed at first, the Healys have successfully infiltrated the series, and what a good thing this is proving to be.
Suddenly they're practically the central family, with some of the series' juiciest, most compelling scenes at the moment
Just finished episode 219 and Martin's adopted daughter has arrived, with a surprise.
It isn't always easy to immediately care for a new character, therefore I'm happy to read your positive impressions.
I like Peter, and the tension in his body language. He comes across as a contemporary tv character who's been transported back to the eighties.
Patricia and Martin's relationship goes a bit to and fro at the moment, with the additional smart comment by Wayne.

The Keegans found a new home and I like all the stuff with the neighbours and the creepy kid.
upload_2019-7-27_23-35-4.png

I like the fact that Angela has decided not to get involved with the Healys, and stick with David as her newfound not-really-biological dad.
As Beryl said to John after he had announced the wedding plans "your father and I started to feel like second best".

Bizarrely enough they decided to do two creepy stranger storylines at the same time. I haven't decided about Brian yet but, oh well, as long as he keeps sweating.
And I usually like all the Woombai episodes and its beautiful scenery, and the main guest house set looks particularly comfy.
But it's strange that Beryl changed her mind about the second honeymoon (unless I missed something).

Paul has forgotten to pick up his study with the priests, and now he's being too tall in Jill's apartment. Barbara is going to a retreat of sorts which means that the Hamilton mansion is becoming an empty place again. And Charlie? Who knows where she is. Maybe she'll meet Lynn during a fashion show in Amsterdam.
 

Mel O'Drama

Super Moderator
Staff Member
Messages
6,946
Reaction score
9,561
Medals
12
Member Since
28th September 2008
He comes across as a contemporary tv character who's been transported back to the eighties.
I like this and will keep it in mind when watching his scenes.


The Keegans found a new home and I like all the stuff with the neighbours and the creepy kid.
I enjoy that they have their own territory now. A lot of their scenes as a married couple up to this point have been about interactions with others outside of their relationship, and that was magnified by them living with Susan. It's good that they now have a more 'nuclear' space for the viewer to get a sense of how they function as a unit. Although most of their scenes still involve others, which is perhaps a little telling about their relationship.


I haven't decided about Brian yet but, oh well, as long as he keeps sweating.
I'd be sweating too if I had the cheek to use that terrible accent.


Paul has forgotten to pick up his study with the priests, and now he's being too tall in Jill's apartment.
Things are about to get really good with Paul. I'm thoroughly enjoying his scenes at the moment.


And Charlie? Who knows where she is. Maybe she'll meet Lynn during a fashion show in Amsterdam.
Oh, I dare say she'll show up at exactly the perfect moment to help someone get the better of someone else by using her gushy femininity.

Or something. :cool1
 

Mel O'Drama

Super Moderator
Staff Member
Messages
6,946
Reaction score
9,561
Medals
12
Member Since
28th September 2008
#246

Margaret is a delight. She has Patricia's art of "accidentally" saying the wrong thing in order to win points with the philosophy that the best way to make herself look good is to make someone else look bad ("Oh dear. I have put my foot in it, haven't I?"). Watching her work is captivating, especially since it's often so ambiguous and it's only afterwards that her motive is clear. In many ways she's closer to early Patricia than the current, slightly more arch Patricia is.

Her relationship with Patricia is giving me more sympathy for both characters. There's a power struggle going on there and both make each other miserable. With Patricia holding more clout most of the time Margaret gains a little more of my sympathy, which seems important for such a character. Her ruthlessness (admittedly fairly mild by the standards of some others on the show) is shown to be almost necessary. There's a sense she's fighting: living from one day to the next, relying on her wits to survive.

But she also wants her sister to get her just desserts. Part of me really wants to see her succeed, even though I know she can't possibly. In other words, I'm invested.

It feels like she's on the clock. As things stand, her hold over Patricia will be over in just a few short days. Then all bets will be off. Patricia's had time to come up with a fitting punishment. But Margaret is going to come out fighting. And a cornered Dunne is a very dangerous thing.


Meanwhile, the apple hasn't fallen far from the tree with Angela, who for all her sweetness really just wants to have everything her way with no concern for others' feelings. Unless the consequences directly affect her, she's happy to carry on hurting everyone else. The extent of her entitlement was probably best summarised when she whined at Beryl for
refusing to cover while Angela cheated on Beryl's brother. Then she assured Beryl that she still wanted Rob. She just wanted to have Paul too. And Rob finding out would be unkind because then he wouldn't be happy.
It's an interesting take on things, to say the least. And it's not that she's consciously selfish. She really believes that as long as she feels happy and others appear to be happy that's all that matters. And it makes perfect sense when one thinks of her being a little princess to Gordon and then David. And of her parents' marriage of convenience, with both ultimately seeking happiness elsewhere. These traits are completely in character for Angela. They go way back to the beginning of the series (with Simon Armstrong and John) and earlier still (the marriage she broke up for fun), which even makes me wonder if she is becoming less selfish in her own strange way.

All the same, that was one slap in the face that was well and truly deserved.
 

Willie Oleson

Telly Talk Schemer
Messages
13,895
Reaction score
16,099
Location
Plotville, Shenanigan
Medals
15
Member Since
April 2002
I'd be sweating too if I had the cheek to use that terrible accent.
His Irish accent sounds perfect to me, but what do I know?:D
Things are about to get really good with Paul. I'm thoroughly enjoying his scenes at the moment.
It's definitely one of the more interesting character journeys, and like I've said before I really enjoy the actor's theatrical performance.
And a cornered Dunne is a very dangerous thing
Yes, I remember things getting a little crazy at some point...a Katherine-esque car crash perhaps?
Meanwhile, the apple hasn't fallen far from the tree with Angela, who for all her sweetness really just wants to have everything her way with no concern for others' feelings
She is far more flawed than I remembered, and that's a good thing. Her stance on Fiona and the Woombai debacle was surprisingly harsh - and it's still one of my favourite S&D feuds because it was a fall-out between friends (as opposed to everything that's happening with Wayne, who just wants to be hated or so it seems).
All the same, that was one slap in the face that was well and truly deserved
I'll keep my eyes peeled for that


I haven't been feeling well this week, had to call in sick, therefore I haven't watched as much as I wanted to. Hopefully I'll get a little closer to your viewing point this week.
And then there was Patricia's depression (but not hysterical enough) which was also a mini-depression for the show itself (imho).
 

Mel O'Drama

Super Moderator
Staff Member
Messages
6,946
Reaction score
9,561
Medals
12
Member Since
28th September 2008
like I've said before I really enjoy the actor's theatrical performance.
His voice is great. There have been a couple of moments where his voice has exactly the right quality to be a serial killer at the end of a phone in a slasher flick. If that makes sense.


Yes, I remember things getting a little crazy at some point...a Katherine-esque car crash perhaps?
Oh, I dare say. I've forgotten lots about this era of the show, which makes watching quite exciting.


She is far more flawed than I remembered, and that's a good thing.
Agreed on both counts.


Her stance on Fiona and the Woombai debacle was surprisingly harsh - and it's still one of my favourite S&D feuds because it was a fall-out between friends
Yes. And I don't feel there's been a quick fix with it. Recent history lingers on in their scenes together, even if it's unspoken.


I haven't been feeling well this week, had to call in sick, therefore I haven't watched as much as I wanted to.
Oh, sorry to hear that Willie. Hope having a bit of rest has helped and you're on the mend.

But... can you ever watch as much as you want to?! ;)



Hopefully I'll get a little closer to your viewing point this week.
I've been fairly busy this weekend and have slowed down from the outrageous number I'd started to watch each day. I've averaged four or five a day over the weekend, which is still plenty.


And then there was Patricia's depression (but not hysterical enough) which was also a mini-depression for the show itself (imho).
It was certainly a change of tone, but I really liked it. It was fascinating to see how different the show was with this one key character's change of behaviour. It also helped make Patricia more fleshed out, human and sympathetic. I love how flawed she is. But it also served the plot well, such as starting to restore her relationship with Angela and bringing Margaret into the picture. I was impressed that it went on for a while - especially at the rate it was originally broadcast.
 

Willie Oleson

Telly Talk Schemer
Messages
13,895
Reaction score
16,099
Location
Plotville, Shenanigan
Medals
15
Member Since
April 2002
It was fascinating to see how different the show was with this one key character's change of behaviour
But it also served the plot well, such as starting to restore her relationship with Angela and bringing Margaret into the picture
I love the result of it, but after the climax of season/chapter 1 (and I really enjoyed those first new episodes) there was a sense of directionlessness and it was mostly John who had to move the story forwards. At the same time there were some sub-plots going on that weren't extremely gripping, but in retrospect probably had some ripple effect.
Patricia's depression itself made sense, I think it had to happen in order to rearrange her relationship with the other characters (e.g. Rob and Angela), thus avoiding a permanent fall-out and story standstill.
There have been a couple of moments where his voice has exactly the right quality to be a serial killer at the end of a phone in a slasher flick. If that makes sense.
Yes it does.
 
Top