Grammarants

Daniel Avery

Moderator
Staff Member
LV
4
 
Messages
5,443
Reaction score
7,846
Awards
13
Location
Sunny South Florida
Member Since
June 10, 2000
Favourite Movie
The Man In the Ironic Mask
[raises glass of fine, fine chardonnay in Angela's direction]

Which brings me to the Express Lane at most supermarkets, where they post signs saying:

Ten Items or Less :r&r:

Publix Supermarkets is the only chain I've seen getting it right:

Ten Items or Fewer :bl2:
 

Seaviewer

Telly Talk Winner
LV
4
 
Messages
3,536
Reaction score
5,367
Awards
12
Location
Australia
Member Since
14 September 2001
Angela tiptoes into the room and whispers "Shouldn't that be ten times fewer?" Angela tiptoes out of the room to avoid being shouted at.
Grammatically speaking, yes, but it still doesn't solve the arithmetic error.
 

Seaviewer

Telly Talk Winner
LV
4
 
Messages
3,536
Reaction score
5,367
Awards
12
Location
Australia
Member Since
14 September 2001
Angela tiptoes into the room and whispers "Shouldn't that be ten times fewer?" Angela tiptoes out of the room to avoid being shouted at.
Taking a second bite of the apple...
It depends on whether one is talking about individual items or a collective. For example: less bread, but fewer slices; less sand, fewer grains.
 

Seaviewer

Telly Talk Winner
LV
4
 
Messages
3,536
Reaction score
5,367
Awards
12
Location
Australia
Member Since
14 September 2001
Using a metaphor from one sport to describe another.
Not really a matter of grammar; it just sounds strange when the start of a tennis or golf tournament is referred to as "kicking off."
 

Daniel Avery

Moderator
Staff Member
LV
4
 
Messages
5,443
Reaction score
7,846
Awards
13
Location
Sunny South Florida
Member Since
June 10, 2000
Favourite Movie
The Man In the Ironic Mask
Richard Avery, discussing Karen's refusal to cry over Sid's recent death:
"A little falling apart could do Karen some good. I mean, she's never going to get over this thing until she grieves. It's like trying to keep a lid on a smoldering keg."
Laura: "Did you just mix a metaphor?"
Richard: No, a martini." [offers her a glass]
 

Seaviewer

Telly Talk Winner
LV
4
 
Messages
3,536
Reaction score
5,367
Awards
12
Location
Australia
Member Since
14 September 2001
When someone asks "Do you mind if I . . . ?" and the answer is "Yes" or "Sure" when it should be "No, I don't mind."
 

Seaviewer

Telly Talk Winner
LV
4
 
Messages
3,536
Reaction score
5,367
Awards
12
Location
Australia
Member Since
14 September 2001
Do you say "set foot" or "step foot"?
It always used to be "set foot" but at some point people started to say "step foot", which frankly just sounds weird to me.
 

bmasters9

Telly Talk Star
LV
1
 
Messages
2,562
Reaction score
1,952
Awards
6
Location
LL
Using a metaphor from one sport to describe another.
Not really a matter of grammar; it just sounds strange when the start of a tennis or golf tournament is referred to as "kicking off."

Or the start of any event (like rock or country music concerts).
 

Seaviewer

Telly Talk Winner
LV
4
 
Messages
3,536
Reaction score
5,367
Awards
12
Location
Australia
Member Since
14 September 2001
And here's another: The winning goal of a soccer match described as a "slam dunk".
 

bmasters9

Telly Talk Star
LV
1
 
Messages
2,562
Reaction score
1,952
Awards
6
Location
LL
And here's another: The winning goal of a soccer match described as a "slam dunk".

Indeed, given that you kick the ball and move it with your feet in soccer, and the only one who can touch it with his/her hands (outside of a throw-in) is the goalie.
 

Angela Channing

World Cup of Soaps Moderator
LV
11
 
Messages
11,078
Reaction score
16,723
Awards
32
Member Since
1999
And here's another: The winning goal of a soccer match described as a "slam dunk".
The ball went in because they got the rub of the green (snooker term) and the opposition team's defending was below par (golf) enabling the winning team to break their duck (cricket) and the baton passes (relay) to the new champions.
 

bmasters9

Telly Talk Star
LV
1
 
Messages
2,562
Reaction score
1,952
Awards
6
Location
LL
The ball went in because they got the rub of the green (snooker term) and the opposition team's defending was below par (golf) enabling the winning team to break their duck (cricket) and the baton passes (relay) to the new champions.

Never knew that so many terms could be combined into one assessment!
 

Seaviewer

Telly Talk Winner
LV
4
 
Messages
3,536
Reaction score
5,367
Awards
12
Location
Australia
Member Since
14 September 2001
When people talk about losing demerits (usually in the context of traffic infringements).
A demerit is literally a reduction in merit so saying you're losing them is akin to a double negative.
 

DallasFanForever

Telly Talk Supreme
LV
3
 
Messages
10,621
Reaction score
18,566
Awards
15
Location
Bethpage, NY
Member Since
New
One that’s always baffled me is a professional sports team in Los Angeles that calls themselves the Angels, specifically since Los Angeles already means “The Angels” in Spanish. I know Los Angeles only refers to the city itself but when you think about it their name is “The Angels Angels.” It’s quite redundant.
 

Daniel Avery

Moderator
Staff Member
LV
4
 
Messages
5,443
Reaction score
7,846
Awards
13
Location
Sunny South Florida
Member Since
June 10, 2000
Favourite Movie
The Man In the Ironic Mask
Not sure if it still the case, but they used to play their games in Anaheim, leading to a movement to call them The Anaheim Angels. It never caught on, though.

Bit of a tangent, but I have to share this with someone....
Recently (Jan. 6) there was a small group of protesters gathered alongside the bridge leading out of town. Stuck at the traffic light, I looked out the passenger window to see a purple-haired young girl earnestly waving a hand-written sign saying "Reject Facism". It does NOT help your cause when you misspell 50% of the words on your sign, sweetie. An attempt to correct her spelling with a red magic marker might have gotten me on some kind of enemies list, so I resisted the urge.
 

Seaviewer

Telly Talk Winner
LV
4
 
Messages
3,536
Reaction score
5,367
Awards
12
Location
Australia
Member Since
14 September 2001
There's been an ad running here recently - I think they call them PSAs in America - telling us not to put recyclable items in plastic bags before placing them in the bin.
It ends with a friendly garbo saying to put them in loose - "like your neighbour". Then cuts to a shot of said neighbour standing behind her bin.
I assume the double entendre is unintended but simply adding the word "does" at the end would clarify it.
 
Top