Tipping

Snarky Oracle!

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What made you think it was a lie?

Nuance.

I would believe someone else. But there was the whiff of saltpeter in the air only detected after we left.
 

DallasFanForever

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I’m an admitted big tipper, as long as the service is good of course. I like now how they’ve made it easier to tip when you’re using your credit card and have all the percentages already figured out. It does make the math easier.
 

Angela Channing

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We are often asked to do supermarket and bank transactions ourselves (self-check registers, ATMs), but they have not (yet) asked us to cook our own Quarter Pounder or drive the taxi ourselves. But give it time...I'm sure they're working on it.
In McDonald's you have to place your order yourself and pay without dealing with an employee. I could ask why we tip restaurant staff and not staff in a fast food chain even though both groups carry out similar functions..
 

Daniel Avery

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As I said earlier in this thread, my personal feeling is that if you have to 'clean up behind yourself' (throw your stuff away before leaving) then I don't see a reason anyone has earned the right to a tip. Obviously there are other unique tasks of a "fast casual" or a full service restaurant that also apply (such as wait staff in the dining room doing things for the diners) but since different restaurants decide upon different levels of service, it's not clear-cut. The majority of fast-casual places still follow the traditional model of wait staff showing us to a table and taking our orders, bringing the food and offering additional assistance as needed like drink refills and extra napkins. etc. The staffer then takes away the plates, etc. and brings a bill. You then settle up the bill after all that is finished---ostensibly so that the diner can judge the tip by the overall service received throughout the visit. Most fast food places offer none of that: you place your order at a counter or a kiosk, pay for the food, and someone brings it to a counter (not your table) for you to take to the table, and no one is working the dining room offering special assistance. They feel their tasks are done when the tray is handed to you, and since they already have your money, they theoretically no longer have to really be helpful. Need refills, napkins, etc.? They're available to get yourself. And if you don't buss your table, then you're looked at as some selfish, lazy slob who ought not be allowed in public.

So they are very different dining experiences, even if many aspects are similar. There is even some overlap in specific things restaurants do or do not do for customers, as so many are experimenting with ways to "do more with less" or to differentiate themselves in a difficult business. Chick-Fil-A is as "fast food" as you can get, but while they make you order at the counter, they will bring the food to your table and often have a person working their dining room offering simple help like refilling drinks or cleaning up. The Steak-and-Shake example I offered upthread shows how things can also go in the other direction toward no interaction. Sonic Drive-Thru has car spaces set aside so that a "carhop" brings your food out to the car so you can eat while parked outside. So it's all a free for all---no wonder we're all confused. :re:
 

Snarky Oracle!

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In McDonald's you have to place your order yourself and pay without dealing with an employee. I could ask why we tip restaurant staff and not staff in a fast food chain even though both groups carry out similar functions..

I haven't been to a McDonald's in years, so I don't know how they work today over here. Last time I went inside one, we were still ordering from a clerk behind the counter who then brings you that food (if it really qualifies as food).

As an aside, I made a rare trip through Wendy's drive-thru the other week. Ordered my burger and Frosty from the speaker-mic, drove to the first window to pay -- employee#1 took my money and gave me change, I said "thank you!" because I'm pleasant, she sourly didn't respond but I assumed she was busy and/or distracted by the events of her life; I drove to the second window to pick up my food, I had to tell employee#2 what my order was (although they weren't very busy) and they brought me the correct bag, I said "thank you" because I'm pleasant, she sourly didn't respond, but that's okay; I then had to tell employee#3 that a large Frosty was part of my order, he then served up an obviously small one but I wasn't going to get into it with him about it, so as he handed me the small Frosty and, as if anticipating displeasure from me, he asks haughtily, "Chu ain't gonna say 'chu welcome'?!" (even though, as the customer, my saying 'thank you' once again would have been more logically appropriate, had I felt thankful by that point in the process). He stared tauntingly at me as I took the cup of frothy slop and drove away in cold silence, ensconced in my supremacist entitlement.

Ugh, demographic stuff.

Thank goodness no one chased down my car to get a tip.

 
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Crimson

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I'd be perfectly happy for every restaurant, even high end, to switch to ordering via a kiosk or app and then picking up your own food at the counter. I find nothing appealing about being "served". It seems like the kind of thing Boomers enjoy-- the obsequious bootlicking and faux-hospitality of someone groveling for a tip.

Mind you, I am a good tipper because it's the cultural expectation in the United States and I'm not a jerk, but there's never been a single instance in my life where I thought the service was anything other than perfunctory or mildly annoying; certainly not a plus to eating out.
 

Willie Oleson

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I could ask why we tip restaurant staff and not staff in a fast food chain even though both groups carry out similar functions..
And since we're all doing some kind of job, why not tipping eachother every day, all day long.
After I've paid for my overpriced groceries - and the price of cigarettes going up with 4,50 euro (!!) - I am really not in the mood to tip anyone.

I've never understood how Americans calculate the customary tip, I mean, what is 15% of $ 22,78? They must be very smart people because I couldn't do it without a calculator.
I'm more of a "keep the change" kind of person, especially for services I don't use very often. If I'm feeling very happy because a taxi driver drives me from A to B (I have no sense of orientation and get lost very easily) then he's welcome to a generous tip. But again, it's based on a feeling, not his job.
 

Jock Ewing Fan

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And since we're all doing some kind of job, why not tipping eachother every day, all day long.
After I've paid for my overpriced groceries - and the price of cigarettes going up with 4,50 euro (!!) - I am really not in the mood to tip anyone.

I've never understood how Americans calculate the customary tip, I mean, what is 15% of $ 22,78? They must be very smart people because I couldn't do it without a calculator.
I'm more of a "keep the change" kind of person, especially for services I don't use very often. If I'm feeling very happy because a taxi driver drives me from A to B (I have no sense of orientation and get lost very easily) then he's welcome to a generous tip. But again, it's based on a feeling, not his job.
Not that difficult if 20% is the standard.
It would be 1 for every 5.

Another method - if the bill exceeds 100, take the first two digits and multiply by 2
ie 160 . 16 x 2 = 32

if less than 100

ie 80 - take first digit and multiply by 2 8 x 2 = 16

Depends who is asked, but I think 20% is now standard
 

Daniel Avery

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Which reminds me....there are now pop-ups on so many POS (point of sale) screens suggesting tips. They will show higher-than-normal numbers (three or four to choose from) hoping people will just absent-mindedly tap a higher-value box and not think about it. I got my hair cut recently and the POS software suggested a 40% tip in a larger font than the 20% or 25%, and a grayed-out box at the bottom said "move to next screen" (the only way to get away with not tipping). The grayed-out color was meant to fool the user into believing it wasn't "live" (in other words, not tipping was not an option). I used the 20%, but if I'd not seen all the subterfuge, I might have given 25%.
 
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tommie

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I dunno
We normally don't tip in Sweden, though there's been some places where it's popped up so... what's the courtesy here?
 
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