Doctor Who Watching NuWho

James from London

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I have watched my first full series of one of the Doctors.
Congratulations! I wanted to wait till you'd got this far before commenting.
I'm a fan of pre-Barnabas Dark Shadows
Me too, like I'm a fan of pre-Amanda Melrose Place. (And pre-Abby and Alexis Knots and Dynasty of course, but that's different somehow.)
The first next generation doctor is Christopher Eccleston and now I want to watch every movie/series he's done.
May I humbly suggest you start with Cracker, which is an absolute cracker.
It took me a few moments to realize that this series is still very much a children's programme
Like absolutely everything else about Who, that is up for debate. But I vividly remember a TV interview Eccleston did when he took on the role (at least I think I do -- he didn't do many interviews and I've not been able to find it since, so I'm beginning to think I dreamt it) where he firmly stated that this new version of the series belonged to the children of today (i.e. 2005) just as the original had belonged to previous generations of kids. I loved that. It meant it wasn't my Doctor Who, but I had the privilege of watching it anyway. (I took that same attitude to New Dallas as well: this wasn't mine; I had no ownership of it, and somehow that made it an even more exciting experience.) I remember thinking how much kids would be loving the farting aliens, which the BBC never would have stood for when I was growing up. It wasn't until years later that I discovered how unpopular the farting aliens were with Who Fandom, who take the whole thing altogether more seriously.
nothing is being questioned in a serious manner and the best way for me to enjoy it is to embrace the goofy and lampoony tone like a child would do, because children aren't very interested in real-life rules.
I don't think I felt it was un-serious as such. Like New Dallas, New Who was/is a much more emotional viewing experience than the original, but it was also bolder, brighter and more audacious. But yes, going along for the ride is definitely the best way to enjoy it. However, that means accepting that sometimes it isn't a children's programme after all, and then the next week it is again. More than any other series, perhaps, Who is a show about change. It changes from Doctor to Doctor, and from episode to episode. What was wonderful about that first Eccleston series is that I had no expectations and so it all came as a thrilling surprise.
The whirlwind character that is Doctor Who doesn't really comfort the viewer that everything's going to be all right which adds to the surprise when he does get it right.
It's taken me years and years, but I've now re-watched almost all of New Who (apart from the most recent season), but in a time-wimey, higgledy-piggedly out of order order, and I've noticed how often the Doctor will act like he's got a plan and get everyone to trust him, but then someone will ask him what the plan is and he admits he doesn't really know.
 
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darkshadows38

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i loved the farting aliens really only cause i got a f.. up sense of humor and yes they are one of the stupidest ideas but it's one of those that is so stupid it's funny.
honestly the past few years haven't been as good as it used to be it really does feel like it's on it's last leg and i think bringing Russell T. Davies back i think is a last attempt on keeping it on the air. i dunno how well it's been doing recently but that's just what i think anyways
 

Willie Oleson

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Christmas episodes often suck because of the obligatory and rather commercial sentiment but maybe this is going to be something different.
I didn't need to worry because it has a killer-Christmas tree, a hostile alien tribe, the infamous button-that-should-never-be-pressed (I love those!) and a story arc with a little plot twist for Harriet Jones, Prime Minister ("yes I know who you are").
When the Doctor tells her that Earth has become a very noisy planet it even feels like a logical argument and I like it that their last scene in this episode has a sense of dilemma, especially because it wasn't necessary to do it.
May I humbly suggest you start with Cracker, which is an absolute cracker.
Found it!
I don't think I felt it was un-serious as such.
It is very serious to the characters, but the Doctor Who world is accepted in the real world even though it never seriously affects real life (again, except for the characters).
A more adult-oriented narrative would try to explain why all this can or can't happen, even if it's done from a science fiction point of view.
i loved the farting aliens really only cause i got a f.. up sense of humor
Sometimes it's the funny stuff that makes it creepy, and vice versa.
 

darkshadows38

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i could not agree more it's amazing that out of all the movies that first had farts in it was the masterpiece Blazing Saddles (1973) that was the first kind of entertainment that had farts in it
 

Willie Oleson

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i loved the farting aliens really only cause i got a f.. up sense of humor
I didn't think much of it, except that it could expose that there was something fishy going on.

"Don't analyze the music, just dance to it", some great advice once given to GOLDEN GIRL Rose Nylund - although I'm not sure it works that way for professional dancers.
I'm still new to DOCTOR WHO and while I'm feeling it I can't quite put my finger on it.
Episode S2.3 "School Reunion" gave me that essential piece of missing Doctor Who insight: a major part of its strength is what they don't do.
Taking apart the different aspects that creates the Doctor Who genre (because it's so much more than just a concept) none of it would be successful enough of its own.
A futuristic yet gothic hospital laboratory run by cat-nuns could only happen in a very very bad full length movie, and the same goes for any serious emotion between a human and a Time Lord. The funny stuff wouldn't be funny enough if that's what it was all about.
But it isn't just the bizarre mix of these things that makes the episodes so entertaining, it's the pace and editing of that mix.

I had never seen Sarah Jane Smith before but the reaction to the re-introduction of this character told me everything I needed to know .
Anything more would have spilled over into schmaltz, and it's almost uncanny that they know exactly what to leave out.
While I don't consider these two first NuDoctors to be the centrefold type, they are obviously a little prettier than their ClassicWho counterparts. Since I don't know how this compares to the narrative of the classic stories I can't say for sure that the NuDoctor has been somewhat sexualized.
Either way, the point is that romantic moments are genuine but not too influential. A kiss is a real kiss and all the emotions that the characters don't understand come together in that kiss, but when it's over it's completely done and it's business as usual.

All the interactions between Sarah Jane and Rose and the Doctor hit the right notes with nothing more than required, and this also explains the unspoken understanding between Rose and Mickey (although it appears Mickey is going to board the Tardis and I wonder how much it will affects the dynamics, and how will Jackie cope all by herself?)
There's a lot to convey if you choose your words carefully, and I find it very telling (!) whenever this is being replaced with pondering montage scenes featuring a Lana Del Rey-esque soundtrack. You got a language. You got a mouth. Use it.
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Using only the best bits of each story-aspect allows every episode to go out with a bang. Admittedly, sometimes it also excuses the haphazard solution to yet another hysterical planet-threatening problem.
 

Willie Oleson

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There's an unexpected and very dramatic twist at the end of the Cybermen 2-part adventure: Mickey decides to replace dead doppelganger Rickey in Parallel Universe Land.
To get an idea of what that means, it's like Rita staying in the Carrington mansion forever. Yes, forever, because the Doctor explains - with that SciFi-convenient logic - that it's not possible to return. Well actually it wasn't a chosen destination, the Tardis had literally slipped into a time-crack.
So anyway it all feels very epic and more like a season's finale, and even though I had my doubts about Mickey as a resident Traveller, it's much harder to imagine the series without him.
It was also very much a no-win situation for Rose because her mother died in Parallel Universe and her father is dead in the Real Universe.
She could have stayed for Mickey's sake but he is already developing an underground resistance bromance with Rickey's former sidekick Jake. And now, now in Parallel Universe, Mickey thinks it would be awesome to visit Fake Paris.
I guess it's always good to have an extra bucket list just in case you're going to replace a doppelganger.
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How I wish I could have been a fly on the wall in the writer's room. What was going on when they created the story of a spaceship with Clock Robots and windows to different parts in the life of Madame de Pompadour, which could be entered through a rotating fireplace??
Incidentally, I've always thought she was decapitated which could have been the starting point for this episode since the Clock Robots wanted her head. But apparently she died of tuberculosis or maybe a broken heart because she was very much in love with the Doctor.
The next story is about evil TV sets from the 1950s, I'm sure it's going to be another cracker.
 
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