Ingrid Bergman Remembered - 1915 - 1982

Barbara Fan

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Ingrid Bergman and Cary Grant: An “Indiscreet” Friendship
sistercelluloid ♦ August 30, 2015 ♦

“A kiss could last three seconds. We just kissed each other and talked, leaned away and kissed each other again. Then the telephone came between us, then we moved to the other side of the telephone. So it was a kiss which opened and closed; but the censors couldn’t and didn’t cut the scene because we never at any one point kissed for more than three seconds. We did other things: we nibbled on each other’s ears, and kissed a cheek, so that it looked endless, and became sensational in Hollywood.” —Ingrid Bergman, recalling The Kiss That Launched A Thousand Antacids in the Hays Office.


In a way, that Notorious kiss mirrored Bergman’s lifelong friendship with Cary Grant: an effortless intimacy, never really separated even when apart—and always finding their way back to each other.



They first met briefly in 1938, at a party David O. Selznick threw to welcome Bergman to Hollywood and promote Intermezzo. But they didn’t spend any real time together until Alfred Hitchcock teamed them up eight years later. Bergman had just painfully parted from war photographer Robert Capa, whom she’d met and fallen in love with while entertaining the troops in Europe. Grant was in the midst of a divorce from heiress Barbara Hutton. Orphans of the storm, they found safe harbor with each other.

Usually friendly but reserved toward his co-stars, Grant immediately sensed Bergman’s deep unhappiness and unease. Though she’d worked with Hitchcock before, on Spellbound, the part of Alicia Huberman called for her to be far more vulnerable and much less in control—emotions uncomfortably close to her real life at the time. Grant instinctively took her under his wing, protecting her from the rigors of a role that frayed every raw nerve.



The two grew close as they worked through their intimate scenes between takes, and often talked late into the night—sometimes about their director, who once called Grant “the only actor I ever loved” but was, at times, his usual autocratic self with Bergman, perhaps to mask his growing feelings for her.

“Ingrid took acting so seriously—she was a splendid, splendid performer but she wasn’t very relaxed in front of the camera,” Grant recalled years later. “She spoke English beautifully, of course, but she would occasionally have problems with some of its nuances.

“One morning, she had difficulty with her lines,” he went on. “She had to say her lines a certain way so I could imitate her readings. We worked on the scene for a couple of hours. Hitch never said anything. He just sat next to the camera, puffing on his cigar.”

Fearing he might be making her even more self-conscious, Grant stepped away from the set. “Later, when I was making my way back, I heard her say her lines perfectly,” he said. “At which point Hitch said ‘Cut!’ Followed by ‘Good morning, Ingrid.'”

After filming one of the most famous scenes—where the camera swoops down the spiral staircase to zero in on the key in Bergman’s hand—Grant did something he’d almost never felt compelled to do on a set before or since: he kept a souvenir. More on that later…


As the summer of ’46 wore on, the Notorious set became more relaxed. Bergman and Hitchcock had become such friends that he even allowed her to—gasp!—make suggestions about certain scenes. And she and Grant, it was clear, would remain close, regardless of where life or movies took them. A few months later, at the 1947 Academy Awards, Grant declared, “I think the Academy ought to set aside a special award for Bergman every year whether she makes a picture or not!”



When the movie wrapped in August 1946, Grant made the unlikely segue into The Bachelor and the Bobby Soxer, while Bergman headed to New York to star in Maxwell Anderson’s Joan of Lorraine. Wandering along Broadway one day, she ducked into a theatre to see Roberto Rossellini’s Open City and was powerfully struck by its rawness and lack of artifice. After seeing a second film by the director, she wrote to him with an unusual offer:

“Dear Mr. Rossellini, I saw your films, Paisan and Open City, and enjoyed them very much. If you need a Swedish actress who speaks English very well, who has not forgotten her German, who is not yet very understandable in French, and who, in Italian, knows only ‘ti amo,’ I am ready to come and make a film with you.”

He accepted.

After shooting Under Capricorn, her final film for Hitchcock, as well as Joan of Arc, based on the Anderson play, Bergman headed to Italy. Not long after, in April 1949, news of the married mother’s affair with her Italian director became public. The following February, while in the midst of a divorce and ugly custody battle, she gave birth to their son, Robertino. She and Rossellini married in May 1950.



Bergman was excoriated by preachers, politicians and pundits; she was even denounced from the floor of the US Senate, as if she belonged in the same company as Hitler and Mussolini. American studios slammed their doors, many colleagues turned their backs, and disillusioned moviegoers took to their fainting couches. “People saw me as Joan of Arc and declared me a saint,” she recalled later. “I’m not. I’m just a woman, another human being.”

The list of those who didn’t condemn Bergman was considerably shorter—and at the head of it was Cary Grant. He stood by her and defended her, staying in close touch through all her years in Italy.

But after almost eight years and six films together, Rossellini and Bergman parted in 1956—and by then, Hollywood was ready to “forgive” the actress. She returned to the States to take the lead in Anastasia, and promptly picked up an Oscar nod. The night of the ceremony, she was in Paris starring in Tea and Sympathy. In the event she won, there was only one person she wanted to accept the award on her behalf.

And she won. And he did.


Not long after, Grant teamed with director Stanley Donen to produce Indiscreet, and both dearly hoped that Bergman would sign on. Donen arrived in Paris to make a personal pitch—but, having already learned of Grant’s involvement, though nothing else, she was one step ahead of the director. Before he could even settle into the sofa, she said, “I want to put you at ease—I’m going to do the picture.” Then she asked him what, exactly, the picture was.



She would later learn that Grant—who knew her years in Italy had not been lucrative—was making sure she got a percentage of the gross receipts in addition to her fee. Oh and he had authorized a fabulous wardrobe for her, enlisting the aid of a fellow named Christian Dior.

By the time London location shooting began in 1957, Bergman and Rossellini had legally separated. Touching down at Heathrow Airport for a pre-film press conference, Bergman braced herself for the media jackals. She needn’t have worried. Grant was right there waiting.



“I was taken into the transit lounge for the press conference, and there was Cary Grant sitting up on the table,” Bergman later recalled. “He shouted across the heads of the journalists ‘Ingrid, wait till you hear my problems!’”

But the Fleet Street hounds weren’t taking the bait; they continued to howl at Bergman about her impending divorce. “Come on fellas! You can’t ask a lady that!” Grant gallantly quipped. “Ask me the same question and I´ll give you an answer. So you´re not interested in my life? It’s twice as colorful as Ingrid’s!”



Once the rescue mission was complete, filming could commence. In Indiscreet, a romantic comedy based on Norman Krasna’s Kind Sir, Bergman plays Anna Kalman, a glamorous and accomplished actress who falls for Philip Adams (Grant), a world-renowned economist trapped in a loveless marriage with no hope of escape. At least that’s the tragic tale he’s woven for her. In reality, as we learn early on, it’s just an elaborate ruse to avoid serious involvement.

Their chemistry practically pours off the screen, whether they’re nuzzling in the drawing room or sharing the details of their day, split-screen, on the phone. She’s warm, he’s cool. She’s discreet, he’s direct. “Cary was always quick off the trigger,” director Stanley Donen remembered. “Bang—it was there. That was delightful. Ingrid just had a slower tempo. But it wasn’t a problem—they were magic together.”



The whole film feels like a dance of sorts, but there’s also an actual dance scene, which is beyond fabulous. Anna’s discovered the truth about Philip and is seriously pissed. (“How dare he make love to me and not be married!”) But, never one to ruffle an elegant evening, she lets him lead her to the floor anyway. Oh and watch for the moment when Grant bursts into a fabulous, loose-legged jig:


When shooting wrapped, Bergman found a small, neatly wrapped package in her dressing room. Tucked inside was the key to the wine cellar, from Notorious, which Grant had slipped into his pocket as a keepsake years earlier, when they first became friends. With it was a note urging Bergman to keep the key for good luck.

Their last public appearance together was in 1979, when Bergman, looking luminous in royal blue, hosted the American Film Institute’s tribute to Hitchcock:


In the glorious closing scene of Notorious, the desperately ill Alicia clings to Devlin and whispers, with all the strength that’s left in her, “Oh you love me, you love me…” And he assures her, “Long ago, all the time, since the beginning…” And so it was with Cary Grant and Ingrid Bergman.

 

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With Ingrid Bergman and also a few more famous faces and snips of Joan Crawford and jane Wyman at the Oscars
 

Barbara Fan

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Ingrid Bergman: a life in pictures
Ingrid Bergman’s career encompassed work in Sweden, Hollywood, Italy and France before a spell living in London in the 1970s. Curator Nigel Arthur introduces a life in pictures.




Credit: Selznick International Pictures

Ingrid Bergman first arrived in Hollywood from Sweden in 1939, and after completing a screen test she signed a seven-year contract with producer David O. Selznick. It was under contract to Selznick that she first worked with Alfred Hitchcock, on the psychological thriller Spellbound (1945). But her relationship with Selznick was not always easy, and he loaned her to other studios at a profit. At first the idea suited Bergman as it gave her a chance to work with Hollywood’s leading men, including Gary Cooper, Humphrey Bogart, Cary Grant and Gregory Peck.


Portrait by Ernest Bachrach
Credit: Selznick International Pictures

She was also photographed by leading portrait photographers including Ernest Bachrach and Bert Six, who were drawn to her natural smile and apparent vulnerability. Bergman’s sessions with MGM photographer Lazlo Willinger between 1940 and 1944 are particularly striking.


Bergman and the Rossellini family

Despite the enormous success Ingrid enjoyed in Hollywood she felt unfulfilled by the typecasting of the Hollywood system, which led her to write to the Italian film director Roberto Rossellini.

I saw your films Open City [1945] and Paisan [1946], and enjoyed them very much. If you need a Swedish actress who speaks English very well, who has not forgotten her German, who is not very understandable in French, and who in Italian knows only ‘ti amo’, I am ready to come and make a film with you.

The letter was to change her life and in 1949 she left Hollywood to live with Rossellini. The Italian films are widely different from her Hollywood work and convey a pessimism that dismayed Hollywood, particularly Stromboli (1950) as it seemed to deglamorise the star they had so ardently created.


Elena and Her Men (1956): Bergman with Jean Marais

Her personal voyage did not end in Italy and in 1956 Ms Bergman went to Paris, where she starred in Jean Renoir’s Elena and Her Men (Elena et les Hommes), a romantic comedy in which she played a Polish princess caught in political intrigue. Although the film wasn’t a success, it has since come to be regarded as one of her best performances. During the same year, Anastasia was financed by Twentieth Century-Fox and she made a triumphant return to New York to receive the Critics Award.


At the end of her life, she made London her home, making several notable television appearances and co-starring in Murder on the Orient Express (1974), produced by John Brabourne. Here she is seen walking along New Cavendish Street in West London, close to her flat.


In this picture, Bergman is recognised by a fan as she visits Berwick Street market in Soho, London.


On stage at the National Film Theatre (now BFI Southbank) around 1972. Ingrid Bergman (photographed by Richard Lyon) was interviewed by collector and Hollywood historian John Kobal during the John Player Lecture Series.


In an interview in the mid-1970s (photographed here by Karl Heinz Seuffert) with the Swedish journalist Barbaro Bolinder, Bergman says as a young girl she prayed to God for only one thing – that life presented her with surprises. Even after her death, the surprises continued: in 1982 a rose was cultivated in her name and remains popular with gardeners in Poland and England for its deep red velvety petals.
 

Barbara Fan

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In loving memory of Ingrid Bergman, one of the most beautiful women to grace the screen who was born and died on this day 1915-1982.

RIP and thanks again @Karin Schill and Jenny for taking me to her parents grave site and where some of her ashes were scattered, that meant so much! xxxx



 

Barbara Fan

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a few of Miss Bergman and family - how cool in pic no 1 if the son of Ingrid married the daughter of Princess Grace of Monaco - the children would have had great genes!









love BF x
 

Barbara Fan

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Happy Boxing Day to all fans of films past and present



love BF x
 

Barbara Fan

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https://www.vintag.es/2020/02/ingrid-bergman-children.html

Throughout her three marriages, Ingrid Bergman had a total of four children. Her first child, daughter Pia Lindström, was born to Bergman and her first husband, Swedish neurosurgeon Petter Lindström. In 1950, Bergman gave birth to Renato Roberto Rossellini, her first son with Italian director Roberto Rossellini. On June 18, 1952, her twin daughters Isotta Rossellini and Isabella Rossellini were born. Here are 24 lovely vintage photographs capture the actress with her children from the 1950s to 1970s:


Ingrid Bergman observing her son Roberto Rossellini Jr.'s first steps, 1950s. Photo by Mondadori.


Ingrid Bergman strolling with son Roberto Rossellini Jr., Stockholm, 1950s. Photo by Mondadori.


Ingrid Bergman standing in front of a shop window with her son Roberto Rossellini Jr., Stockholm, 1950s. Photo by Mondadori.


Ingrid Bergman going through a photo album with her son Roberto Rossellini Jr., Stockholm, 1950s. Photo by Mondadori.


Ingrid Bergman and Roberto Rossellini, at home in Rome for the first family portrait that includes their twin daughters, Isotta and Isabella, and their first child, Robertino, 1952. Photo by Bettmann.

Ingrid Bergman and her twins Isabella and Isotta Rossellini at their home in Rome, 1952. Photo by Bettmann.


Ingrid Bergman gives her son Robertino Rossellini a piggyback, while on holiday in Portofino, Italy, 1952. Photo by Hulton-Deutsch.


Ingrid Bergman takes a trip round Naples with her son Robertino Rossellini Jr., May 1953. Photo by Bert Hardy/Picture Post.


Ingrid Bergman with her eleven-month-old twins, May 1953. Photo by Bert Hardy/Picture Post.


Ingrid Bergman and her daughter Pia Lindström in a pose smiling near the pier, Capri, 1955. Photo by Mondadori.


Ingrid Bergman playing with her children Roberto Rossellini Jr., Isotta Ingrid and Isabella, 1950s. Photo by Mondadori.


Ingrid Bergman with her 3 young children Robertino, Isotta and Isabella, March 1957. Bergman just won an Oscar for her role in 'Anastasia.' Photo by Bettmann.


Ingrid Bergman hugging her children Isotta, Isabella and Robertino Rossellini Jr., 1950s. Photo by Angelo Cozzi/Mondadori.


Ingrid Bergman going back home with her three children, the twin sisters Isabella and Isotta Rossellini and Roberto Rossellini Jr., 1950s. Photo by Mondadori.


Ingrid Bergman and daughter Pia Lindström getting off a plane, 1957. Photo by Francois Pages/Paris Match.


Ingrid Bergman drives a motor boat with her son, Roberto Rossellini Jr.; the twins, Isabella and Isotta Rossellini; and her eldest daughter, Pia Lindström, 1957. Photo by Bettmann.


Ingrid Bergman, at her Italian villa with her childen, Robertino Rossellini Jr., twins Isotta and Isabella Rossellini, and Pia Lindström, 1957. Photo by Bettmann.


Ingrid Bergman with her childen, Robertino Rossellini Jr., twins Isotta and Isabella Rossellini, and Pia Lindström, 1957. Photo by ullstein bild.


Ingrid Bergman with her twin daughters Isotta and Isabella during shooting of the film 'The Inn of the Sixth Happiness' on location in Wales, August 1958. Photo by Popperfoto.


Ingrid Bergman with her children Isabella, Isotta and Robertino turn back to the camera on the set of the film 'Inn of the Sixth Happiness,' August 1958. Photo by Express Newspapers.


Ingrid Bergman with husband Lars Schmidt and daughter Pia Lindström, August 1958. Photo by William Lovelace-Daily Express.


Ingrid Bergman with her daughter Pia Lindström, April 1959. Photo by Leonard McCombe/LIFE.


Ingrid Bergman clutches her daughter, Isabella's hand while crossing the street, Rome, April 1966. Photo by Bettmann.


Ingrid Bergman sits with her twin daughters Isabella and Isotta after Bergman's performance at the Cambridge Theatre, London, February 1971. Photo by Express Newspapers.
 

Sarah

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I had no idea Isabella Rossellini was a twin!
 

Barbara Fan

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I had no idea Isabella Rossellini was a twin!
Isabella looks so like her mum, her twin less so and they certainly werent identical, she didnt follow her sister into films but is a lecturer

INGRID ROSSELLINI was born in Rome and educated there, and later received a BA, master’s, and Ph.D. in Italian Literature from Columbia, writing her dissertation on Petrarch. She has taught literature and Italian film at Columbia, NYU, Harvard, Princeton, and other universities.
 

Barbara Fan

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This interview is an extra on the Rossellini DVDs and when i bought them i was so pleased to see this interivew that the BBC broadcast in 1981. I waited a long time to see it again in 2017/8

So its nice to see it again - a true star in every sense of the word

 

Barbara Fan

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Nice Interview - Isabella Rossellini , Liv Ullmann & Sigourney Weaver Discuss Ingrid Bergman 2015

 

Barbara Fan

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One of the most readily recognized icons of Hollywood, Ingrid Bergman, has been gone for almost four decades now and has left a lot of memories for her kids to cherish.

As the stunning actress once confessed, she had a conflicting personality. At times, she was this shy and timid girl, but somewhere deep inside, she also had a fierce lioness in her.

The live witnesses of this duality were her beautiful daughters, Pia Lindström, 81, and twins Isabella and Ingrid Rossellini, 67, who recently opened up about their mother.


Ingrid Bergman poses outdoors in a tan leather jacket, circa 1945. | Source: Getty Images




A LONELY CHILDHOOD
In an exclusive segment with "Closer Weekly," Bergman's eldest daughter, Pia, reminisced her mother as a brave woman, but at the same time, she thought her mother was also very frightened.

The "Notorious" actress did not get to spend much time with her parents as Bergman's mother passed when she was just two years old, followed by her father, who died a decade later.


Ingrid Bergman, Swedish actress and film star, c1940. | Source: Getty Images


It was her father who dreamed of a life of stardom for the late Hollywood icon. Pia also recalled that when her grandfather took her mother to the opera, she looked at the stage and immediately decided what she wanted to be in life.

WAY TO HOLLYWOOD
The Sweden born actress had a very lonely childhood after the untimely demise of her parents when her uncle and aunt raised her. The absence of a father figure in her life likely led her to marry Petter Lindström, an older man, at the young age of 21.


Portrait of Ingrid Bergman c.1940. | Source: Getty Images


The birth of Pia, a year into their marriage, was followed by Bergman's worldwide recognition as a producer, David O. Selznick, brought her to America to star in 1939's "Intermezzo."

In the decade that followed, Bergman became an icon in Hollywood's reminisced Golden Era with classic movies like "Casablanca," "Gaslight," and "Notorious" to her name.


Press release publicity photo of Ingrid Bergman for film Gaslight (1944). | Source: Wikimedia Commons


THE FALL OF HER STARDOM
In 1949, Bergman got involved in an extramarital affair with Italian director Roberto Rossellini and got pregnant with Ingrid and Isabella's brother Renato. The news of this illicit affair near tarnished her professional career.





However, Isabella claimed that the two were immensely in love despite the price they had to pay for their relationship. Even after the couple split in 1957, the two remained the best of friends for the rest of their lives.


Ingrid Bergman with daughters, Ingrid and Isabella, and son, Renato c.1957. | Source: Getty images

The Oscar-winning actress's final years were hard and tiring against a decade long battle with breast cancer. Finally, she lost the battle of her life on August 29, 1982, at age 67.

Her memories and looks live on in her family as Elettra Wiedemann, Isabella's daughter, shares an uncanny resemblance to her late grandmother.
 

Karin Schill

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Thanks for sharing. I can't believe that her oldest daughter is 81 years old! :eyes:
Time sure flies!
 

Barbara Fan

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I know @Karin Schill - she has long outlasted her mother who was a young 67 when she died

I have always admired Pia that she didnt jump on the bandwagon and write her biography of her side of the Bergman/Rossellini affair as she was the child that was left behind and didnt see her mother for 6 or 7 years and could have been very bitter about the whole affair. She managed to carve out her own successful career too

 
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